GREATER Coaching Model

With more than two decades of experience, we know that traditional professional development, where teachers receive training before the school year begins, is not adequate to help them accomplish their student-achievement goals. Success for All’s GREATER coaching model is a problem-solving approach that is centered on student data. Teachers use the process to set attainable, student-focused goals.
 
GREATER coaching promotes more meaningful learning opportunities for teachers across the school year and provides support for implementing new teaching strategies and instructional processes. Meaningful and timely feedback, guidance, and celebration empower teachers to be creative, set their own goals for change, and take pride in their students’ achievement.
 
The GREATER Coaching Process
Goal
A performance goal is something that the teacher wants his or her students to achieve.
A learning goal is something that the teacher needs to learn to achieve the performance goal. .
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Reality
Assess the current reality in the classroom that the teacher identified as a barrier to accomplish the goal.
Exploration
Brainstorm strategies that can be utilized or strengthened to ensure that the teacher accomplishes his/her goal.
Actions
Choose a meaningful strategy from those explored. Identify actions of the facilitator/leadership/teachers and/or SFAF coach to support the implementation of the adopted strategy.
Timeline
The who, what, when, and where of the action plans should be used to create a focus and sense of urgency.
Evaluate
Utilize data to evaluate the short-term goal set, and celebrate success.
  Renegotiation    
 
Re-evaluate current goals or set new short-term goals to continue working toward meeting annual schoolwide goals. 

 
The GREATER coaching model aligns with the Goal-Focused Improvement Process that is designed to allow you to achieve greater results with Success for All Foundation programs. This process is characterized by the following three basic principles and is intended to build capacity at the school level:
  • Student achievement results drive the process.
  • This problem-solving model assists you in identifying interventions that will have the greatest impact on the school’s main goals, while fostering broad involvement and ownership.
  • The school community must be supportive and actively involved.
Student achievement results drive the process. The primary feature of the Goal-Focused Improvement Process is that it is data-driven. Student-achievement data are used to determine where schools are currently performing relative to where they want to be, to identify interventions that are most likely to have the greatest impact on achievement, and to evaluate if selected interventions have been successful.
 
A problem-solving process assists you in identifying interventions that will have the greatest impact on the school’s main goals while fostering broad involvement and ownership. The Goal-Focused Improvement Process is a problem-solving approach consisting of nine steps. The process, which requires broad involvement of the school community, is designed to encourage a greater sense of program ownership to sustain a long-term high-quality program implementation over time.
 
The school community must be supportive and actively involved. You initially adopted Success for All programs to increase student achievement. You continue to implement SFAF programs because you have seen tangible results. For SFAF programs to be effective and long term, school leaders—especially the principal—must be supportive and actively involved in the implementation.